This was my third time attending AcademyHealth‘s Annual Research Meeting (ARM), but it was my first time feeling like I wasn’t lost in the crowd.  For a conference with nearly 3000 attendees who all like looking at how healthcare works, it can be hard to find where you belong.

My current conference modus operandi – I love the plenary sessions, I don’t go to paper sessions unless I know the presenter, I stalk the poster halls looking for EMS, and this year I worked the booths like nobody’s business. This post then serves as a summary to the Twitter bonanza that accompanied my attendance.  Given the large number of concurrent sessions this is not a summary of ARM, but rather a summary of my experience at ARM.

ARM & EMS
There were zero presentations and two posters on the topic.  Both posters had to do with a state level overview of MIH/CP programs, one on California, one on Texas.  My hypotheses as to why: EMS providers don’t know that ARM exists, and ARM researchers don’t know that EMS is trying to get into the research game.

Meet the Experts Student Breakfast
If you are a student attendee go to this session, yes it’s always at 8AM on a Sunday morning, but it’s worth the extra effort.  Although they should have had a buzzer or bell every 15 minutes to enforce the “Round Robin” aims of the session, it’s a great way to meet and greet with people just as fresh as you are while also having the opportunity to schmooze with more established careerists in a safe space.

Keynote – Race, Ethnicity, and Health: The Role of Research

Favorite quote: Everyone must advocate for diversity, particularly those at the top


Systems Science Approaches for Public Health and HSR

Favorite quote: Just because the arrow exists, doesn’t mean there is a meaningful relationship, that’s why qualitative insight is valuable.

The Growing Intersection between Data Journalism and HSR: Propublica Surgeon Scorecard

Favorite quote: Our challenge to the health services research community: put us out of business!

Entrepreneurship in Bridging Evidence, Policy and Practice: A Conversation
  • Gonsalves: Hope is a powerful force, and it guides poor decision making
  • Feinstein: One problem we have is not thinking big enough
  • Strong: We knew Disruptive Women had made it when we were invited to the White House for a summit on men’s health
  • Balicer: Take bigger risks more quickly
Open Science in HSR 2.0: New Opportunities for Collaboration to Advance Your Career
Favorite quotes:
  • Holve: As a low bar of what you can do today, think about a report you’ve published in PDF and liberate the data to Excel
  • Kosher: Peer review happens at the end of the process, so you’re reviewing the answer to the question not the question itself

Awards and Lunch Plenary

Choosing Your Own Adventure: Harnessing Data to Inform Policy
Precision Medicine: Researching Access, Clinical Utility, Cost Effectiveness, and Health Outcomes
Until next year,
Counts